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United States of America Driving Guide

United States is a unique beautiful country. Explore all of it by driving when you get your International Driving Permit

2021-08-02 · 9 mins

Known as the land of the free and the home of the brave, the United States of America is a very dynamic country. The majority of its population consists of immigrants, resulting in the country’s diverse cultures and languages. Measuring 3.5 million sq. mi., the U.S. is made up of 50 states, each with its laws and government. With the latter being modeled after the federal government.

Many people dream to live or even visit America; with its scenic views and numerous attractions, people of all ages and varying interests can have fun exploring and discovering the country’s most popular spots and hidden gems. If you’re planning to go to the U.S., you also don’t have to worry about a language barrier since the majority of its citizens can speak English. So make sure to erase all those hesitations, book that ticket to the U.S., and finally get your passport stamped.

How Can This Guide Help You?

Traveling abroad, particularly to the U.S.A, might be a breeze to some people since English is one of its major languages. Others might even assume that driving in the country will be relatively easy. And although this may be true, it can get slightly challenging since there are 50 different states with various laws. By reading this guide, you’ll be fully equipped with all the important knowledge about the U.S., its driving laws, and even its top destinations.

General Information

With a whopping 3.5 million sq. mi., the United States of America is home to diverse people, places, and most importantly, cultures. There isn’t even an official language in the country due to it being a multilingual and multicultural nation. Every year, many tourists flock to the U.S., and if you plan to be one of them, here are some of the most important facts you must first know about the country.

Geographic Location

The United States (U.S.), formally known as the United States of America (U.S.A.), is a country in North America with 50 states; 48 of which are found in the middle latitudes of the continent, one at the northwestern-most region (Alaska), and another at the Pacific Ocean (Hawaii).

The nation’s capital is Washington, D.C., which does not belong to any of the 50 states; however, it is recognized as a federal district. Up north, you can find Canada bordering the United States; you also have the Atlantic Ocean on its east, the Pacific Ocean on its west, and the Gulf of Mexico down south.

Additionally, the U.S. also has five inhabited territories: American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands. These territories are partially self-governing, as allowed by the American government.

Languages Spoken

The United States is a melting pot of cultures, so it’s expected that multiple languages are spoken all over the country. This is also what makes the nation unique and incredibly diverse. There are around 350 languages spoken across the land, with no official language.

However, English is the most spoken language with roughly 254 million native speakers, followed by Spanish with over 43 million speakers. Many people quickly learn Spanish, so it’s no surprise that it’s one of the fastest-growing languages in the US. After Spanish, you have Chinese followed by Filipino, with almost 3 million and 1.6 million native speakers, respectively; other top spoken dialects include Vietnamese and French.

The wide variety of languages just shows how multicultural America is and how there is no particular culture that truly defines the U.S.A. due to the immigrants and the deeply-rooted history of the place.

Land Area

The United States has a total land area of around 3.5 million sq. mi. It competes with the People’s Republic of China, and depending on the source; it may be ranked third or fourth-largest globally. Moreover, the total land areas of the U.S.A., along with Russia and Canada, make-up a quarter of the Earth’s total landmass, further proving that the country is a superpower in terms of size.

History

The United States has been inhabited years before voyagers like Christopher Columbus discovered it. After Columbus set foot on the land, he found the New World inhabited by peoples who most likely originated from Asia. These ethnic groups supposedly arrived roughly 20,000 to 35,000 years before migrating from Asia to North America via the Bering Strait. And after the Europeans first arrived, the indigenous people have already spread throughout the continental U.S.

After the colonization by the Europeans, America’s history becomes complex. One of the first to settle in and explore the area was the Spanish, but eventually, the English laid their claim to the land. Their first colony was in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607, and most of the people that fled to the place were escaping religious persecution. Additionally, by 1620, the Pilgrims, who are the founders of Plymouth, Massachusetts, arrived.

The Europeans who colonized the New World flourished but with the Native American residents’ help, and by the early 1700s, Africans soon after joined the enslaved natives. In 1770, there were already roughly 2 million people making up Great Britain’s 13 colonies. However, on July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was issued, and the American colonies were finally able to sever their connections with Great Britain.

Government

The U.S. has roughly 331 million people governed by a Federal Government with three distinct branches: the legislative, executive, and judicial. The legislative is made up of the Congress, which comprises the Senate and the House of Representatives. For the Executive branch, there is the president, vice president, cabinet, and federal agencies. Lastly, the judicial system consists of the Supreme Court and other courts.

What makes the U.S. unique is how each state has its own government modeled after the Federal Government. The constitution states that the Federal government has specific powers granted to them, and the remainder is reserved for the State and local government. Each state has its own written constitution; furthermore, parking tickets, driver’s licenses, and institutions like schools, libraries, and police departments are under the State and local governments’ control.

Tourism

Travel and Tourism play major roles in the economy of the United States. In 2018, the U.S. welcomed close to 80 million foreign tourists, and roughly $1.6 trillion was generated in the total economic output. Furthermore, inbound travel made up 10% of the country’s exports. The tourism industry is also one of the major employers in America, supporting almost six million jobs in 2018 alone.

For curious travelers, know that the U.S. has a lot to offer, and you can enjoy the national parks, museums, beaches, monuments, theater shows, and other attractions scattered throughout the nation. For those who are into road trips, you can even travel across the country by car and admire the stunning scenery that the U.S. does a great job preserving.

IDP FAQs

Driving in the United States is a great experience; whether you’re German, Chinese, or African, know that all foreign drivers are welcome to see and explore the country. However, it’s very important to take note of the requirements you must carry on the road. One important document is the international driver’s permit, and if you don’t know much about it, don’t hesitate to read this guide to know its importance and the steps in acquiring one.

Can You Drive in the U.S. with a Foreign Driver’s License?

Do you have a business trip scheduled in the U.S.? Or maybe you’re planning to go on a road trip? Of course, this calls for a vehicle, and the only way to legally drive in the U.S.A is if you have a driver’s license. Remember, all foreign licenses are valid. Thus, you can go driving in the United States with a UK licence or even a South African one. However, if your driver’s license is not issued in English or does not have Roman alphabet characters, you will need an International Driver’s Permit(IDP).

An IDP, also often informally called an international driver’s license, can be acquired by non-U.S. citizens from their home country. Still, you have organizations like the International Driver’s Association which issues IDPs. In case you’ve left for your trip without obtaining one, you can still go ahead and apply online from IDA to finally go driving in the United States. Don’t forget your zip code in your address for quick and accurate shipping of your IDP.

For U.S. residents, take note that you’re only allowed to obtain an IDP from the American Automobile Association (AAA) or the American Automobile Touring Alliance (AATA). If you apply for an IDP from any organization aside from those mentioned, your IDP will be automatically invalid.

What States Require International Driving Permits?

The rules of carrying an international driving permit depend on the state that you are visiting. And the states that require foreign visitors to bring an IDP with their local license are:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arkansas
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Mississippi
  • Montana
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington

On the other hand, other states only require an IDP if the tourist’s license is not in English, such as Indiana, Michigan, and New Jersey. In contrast, other states require their visitors to present an IDP with their license once their stay has exceeded 90 days. Examples of these states are California and Colorado.

Nonetheless, if you are driving in the United States of America, it’s best to apply for an IDP, especially if you plan to travel across different states. Each state’s local government and police may differ, so to avoid conflicts along the way, don’t hesitate to get your IDP from the International Driver’s Association. Remember, U.S. citizens are not allowed to obtain an IDP from IDA. If you’re American, you must get yours from AAA or AATA.

How Do I Get an International Driver’s License in the U.S.A.?

As mentioned, if you wish to apply for an IDL (or IDP) for the U.S., you will need to apply from any organization that issues IDLs from your home country. But if you’ve already left for America without obtaining an IDL, your best option would be to apply for one online, and you can do that by ordering an international driver’s license from the International Driver’s Association. Furthermore, if you lose your IDL, you can simply request a replacement from IDA.

If you’ll report the loss of your IDL, simply contact customer service and provide your name and IDL number. Note that your replacement copy is free, and you will only need to pay for the shipping costs. After you’ve followed these steps, all you have to do now is wait for your IDL, so you can go back to driving in the United States. Don’t forget about your zip code when providing your address so you could receive your copy right away.

Applying for an IDL is quick and easy, and if you want to check out the requirements, you can visit the FAQs page. You can also go to the website’s pricing page to canvas the fees you’ll be paying for your IDP. Do note that IDA issues IDLs translated into 12 languages and accepted in over 150 countries. They also ship worldwide, so if you didn’t bring an IDL with you to the U.S., you can apply for one from IDA and they could mail it to you as long as you provide your complete address.

Renting a Car in the United States

Driving in the United States is a fairly easy experience. What makes it even better are the gorgeous sights that you can encounter along the way. However, before you get too excited, remember that you will need a vehicle to get around the country. This section has important information for foreign drivers regarding rental cars, costs, insurances, and even age requirements. So make sure not to skip this part, as you read the guide.

Car Rental Companies

There’s no doubt that you could reach your destination in a few days (or even hours!) if you’ve got plans to go driving across the United States. And although it can be tiring, it’s also very rewarding. Finding a good rental car company is key to having some of the best experiences on the road. So if you want to go road-tripping and explore the U.S., you first need to find a good rental vehicle.

First, keep in mind that the reputation of the rental agency is very important. If they’re well known, and many customers have left good reviews, chances are, your experience with the company will also be great. However, you should also consider that they won’t be cheap since you’re paying for their services. Some of the most reputable and popular rental companies are:

  • Enterprise
  • Hertz
  • Avis
  • Budget
  • Sunnycars
  • Dollar
  • National
  • Thrifty
  • Alamo
  • Sixt
  • Eagle
  • Midway

When it finally comes to renting, you can opt to book a car online or right after you arrive in the States. Some rental companies may be found in the airport, but if you don’t want to rent a vehicle there, you can choose to rent your car at the company’s actual location.

Documents Required

Before you could rent a car, be sure to compile all the important documents to successfully comply with the rental car company’s requirements. All companies require a valid driver’s license and an active credit or debit card as means of payment. Make sure to also bring a passport as an I.D. just in case.

Remember, you can go driving in the United States with a UK licence or even a Chinese one. However, for licenses like the latter (where there are little to no English characters), you will need an international driver's permit as a supplemental document. Lastly, you should also reach the minimum age requirement to be permitted to rent a vehicle.

Vehicle Types

One of the frequently booked cars in the U.S. are economy cars. But remember that choosing a specific vehicle to rent is crucial in having a smooth trip abroad. The driving distances in the United States greatly vary. And you should ask yourself, “Will I be driving wide distances?”, “Am I bringing a lot of luggage?”, “How many passengers will I have?” These are some of the things to think about when choosing a suitable rental car.

For example, if you plan to have off-roading activities, an SUV would be a good choice. Or if you’re traveling as a group and want a more spacious car, renting a multipurpose vehicle (MPV) would be the best idea. Furthermore, other cars you can rent include compact cars, minivans, pickup trucks, station wagons, convertibles, and even luxury cars.

Car Rental Cost

Rental car costs are never constant, and they usually rise as peak season nears. So the best thing you could do to save money is to book a car 6 to 12 months before your trip. Nonetheless, here are the average prices of rental vehicles in the U.S.:

  • Economy – $16 per day
  • Compact – $20 per day
  • Intermediate – $19 per day
  • Standard – $18 per day
  • Full-size – $20 per day
  • SUV – $22 per day
  • Minivan – $22 per day
  • Full-size SUV – $26 per day
  • Premium SUV – $41 per day
  • Compact SUV – $20 per day
  • Standard SUV – $22 per day
  • Intermediate SUV – $22 per day
  • Luxury SUV – $55 per day
  • Mini – $20 per day
  • Premium – $21 per day
  • Passenger van – $33 per day
  • Luxury – $29 per day
  • Convertible – $37 per day
  • Pickup truck – $25 per day
  • Premium coupe – $44 per day
  • Coupe – $96 per day
  • Standard station wagon – $28 per day

Note that renting car accessories, such as GPS devices, car seats, chargers, and more, may also lead to higher fees. Other factors that would lead to more expensive costs include renting a vehicle at the airport and one-way rentals, wherein a customer has different pick-up and drop-off points.

Age Requirements

One of the most crucial requirements to rent a car is the minimum age requirement, which varies among rental car companies in different states. You might think it’s a good idea to go road tripping in places like South Dakota, which is the state in the United States that has the youngest driving age. However, the minimum age requirements imposed by rental car companies range between 21 to 25 years old. And drivers who do not have enough driving experience (those below 25 years) will need to pay a surcharge.

On the other hand, in places with the oldest driving age in the United States, such as New York, the legal driving age is 18 years old, which, fortunately, is also the minimum age requirement in some rental companies like Alamo. But once again, young drivers must pay an additional fee.

Note that a Young Driver surcharge can be as low as $13 (Alamo Michigan) to as high as $57 (To Enterprise New York), but of course, these would differ according to location and company. This means that there are fees much higher than those mentioned. To know about the minimum age requirements, be sure to visit your rental car company’s website. This can help in avoiding complications during car rentals, leading to a smooth trip.

Car Insurance Cost

Besides car accessories, you might want to look into rental car insurance, especially if your travel insurance doesn’t have specific coverages. Rental car insurance is optional, so it’s entirely up to you whether you’ll be purchasing any. However, know that prices would vary according to the rental company and the type of insurance; here are some average ranges for the costs of rental car insurance in the U.S.:

  • Supplemental liability insurance – $8 to $12 per day
  • Loss damage waiver – $20 to $30 per day
  • Personal accident insurance – $3 per day
  • Personal effects coverage – $2 per day
  • Full coverage – $33 to $47 per day

Car Insurance Policy

Sometimes certain policies aren’t covered by your car or travel insurance. That’s why you have the option of purchasing car insurance, which rental car companies also offer. Having this insurance gives you the reassurance that you won’t shell out huge amounts of money in case of accidents or other unforeseen circumstances.

The types of rental car insurance you can buy include collision damage waiver, supplemental liability insurance, personal accident insurance, and personal effects coverage. However, remember that your travel or car insurance may cover the last two types of insurance. So to avoid extra expenses, make sure to discuss insurance policies with your chosen rental car company.

Road Rules in the United States

The U.S.A. has federal laws; however, each state also has its own set of state laws. This makes it more complicated for foreigners, and sometimes even locals. If you are driving wide distances in the United States, you must be familiar with the basic driving laws of the places you’ll be visiting. This is to avoid committing any infractions that could potentially spoil your trip. So be sure to read this guide to learn about all the important road rules in the U.S.

Important Regulations

You can see many tourists, like Latinos, Filipinos, and even Germans, driving in the United States. And although their nationalities differ, they all share one common thing: following the road rules of the country they’re visiting. Many important regulations play a huge role in the safety of all road users. And this section has all the significant regulations that can help foreign drivers avoid violations as they travel from one state to another.

Drunk-Driving

Note that in the United States of America, the percentage of drunk-driving accidents is high. And each day, roughly 28 fatalities are recorded under drunk-driving deaths in the United States. However, the penalties’ severity all boils down to the location, as different states have various road rules. A 0.08% blood alcohol content is the limit to drive in the country legally. For commercial drivers, it’s 0.04%, and for drivers below 21, it’s zero-tolerance. So you’d be considered drunk-driving in the United States if your BAC is beyond these levels.

Aside from the “per se” or legal BAC limit of 0.08%, there is also a “zero tolerance” BAC level, which is typically 0.02% except in a few states. This level of intoxication is illegal for drivers below 21, yet there are still many underage drinking and driving accidents in the United States. Lastly, there is the enhanced penalty BAC, which is typically 0.15% except in some states. At this level, violators must face more serious penalties.

As mentioned, there are different degrees of penalties for drunk-driving in the United States. In Arizona, Georgia, and Tennessee, first offenders will have mandatory jail time. But in states like Wisconsin, first-offense drunk-driving is not considered a crime, and offenders will only receive a ticket for committing a civil infraction. Note that there is a long and dark history of drunk-driving in the United States that has led to numerous crashes and deaths, so to avoid this, just be sure not to drink and drive.

Hands-Free Driving

Have you ever used your phone while driving? Do know that this may lead to a serious offense if you’re caught doing so in the U.S. But of course, each state has different road rules, so you might not be violating any distracted driving laws in the United States. Furthermore, note that there is no total ban on the use of electronic gadgets in the country, and texting and driving laws in the United States also tend to vary in certain states.

For example, there’s no Hand-Held ban or an All Cell Phone ban in Alaska, but there is a Text Messaging Ban. Meanwhile, there is a Hand-Held ban, an All Cellphone ban, and a Text Messaging Ban in Tennessee. The last being typically observed in all states. If you want to learn more about distracted driving laws in the United States, you can visit this page.

Child Car Seats

Another road rule that Americans are very particular about is the usage of car seats. So if you’re bringing children with you, it would be a good idea to rent a car seat if you didn’t bring any. Each state also has different criteria for kids who must use car seats.

For instance, in California, passengers under eight years and less than 57” must have a proper child restraint system. And in North Carolina, child restraint laws apply to children under eight years who weigh less than 80 lbs. Violators may be fined, so make sure to obey these laws for a stress-free trip. If you’re still unfamiliar with the car seat laws in the different U.S. states, you can check out this page to read more about them.

Ensure You’re Fully Prepared Before Driving

Preparing for a trip is the best way to ensure stress-free travel, especially if you’re a foreign driver. Before you set off, make sure to have all the necessary documents you would need for your trip, especially your driver’s license, IDP, passport, car registration, and car insurance. Aside from this, other objects, such as reflective triangles and a vest, fire extinguisher, tool kit, and other emergency items, should also be in your vehicle.

You would also need to do a car check before you get behind the wheel. This is to guarantee that your car is in good condition; here are some things that every driver must do before they begin their journey:

  • Inspect your car — check for any damages, whether it be to your wheels, windows, locks, and other significant parts of your vehicle
  • Adjust your seat — make sure you could clearly see the road and you can use the accelerator and brake; you should also be at least ten inches away from the airbag in case it explodes
  • Adjust your mirrors — try to minimize or eliminate any blind spots by adjusting the side or rearview mirrors
  • Adjust your steering wheel — it should be slightly tilted and comfortable to use
  • Check your seat belts

Lastly, as a driver, you have to ensure that you’re in top condition before hitting the road. Although there aren’t many drowsy driving laws in the United States, you have Maggie’s Law in New Jersey that prohibits driving while sleep-deprived. It’s always important to be in good condition before starting your trip, not only to avoid accidents but also to keep other road users safe.

Hand Signals

Suppose your vehicle’s warning signals and lights aren’t working, and you see a car or even a bicycle approaching. During these instances, you’ll have to rely on hand signals. Hand signals are used in everyday life, typically for common courtesy, and it’s not that far off when it comes to a driver’s hand signals.

Furthermore, these signals are mostly universal and are also used in the U.S. Here are the basic hand signals every driver must remember:

  • Stopping
    If you want to stop, extend your left arm out of the window with your forearm angled down and your fingertips extended. Also, make sure that your palm is facing rearward. This sign means you’re slowing down and should keep your arm at that position until your car comes to a complete stop. To be safe, you can choose to pull your arm back in once you’ve checked that other vehicles are slowing down as well.
  • Turning Left
    If you want to turn left, fully extend your left arm out of the window with your palm forward and fingers extended. Be sure to hold the position until you’ve safely made a left turn.
  • Turning Right
    If you want to turn right, extend your left arm out of the window with your forearm bent upwards, your palm forward, and fingers fully extended and pointing to the sky. And once again, you can only retract your arm once you’ve safely made a right turn.

Parking

As a foreign driver, it’s your responsibility to be courteous and follow the road rules in whatever country you’re visiting. When you’re parking your vehicle in the U.S., there are a few things to keep in mind to avoid violating the law and to ensure your vehicle’s safety. Here are the most important parking rules that you should know:

  • When parking, make sure that you are not stopping or blocking a traffic lane
  • Don’t park your car on a traffic lane, a freeway, or even at an intersection
  • Don’t park your car on a railroad track
  • Don’t park your car on a bridge or in a tunnel
  • Never park alongside a red curb
  • Never park in an area with a No Parking sign
  • Never park 15 feet or closer to a fire hydrant
  • Never park on a sidewalk or a crosswalk
  • Never park your car in front of a driveway or on an area reserved for drivers with disabilities
  • Never park on areas meant for zero-emission vehicles

Of course, to avoid having any belongings stolen, always bring your items with you and never leave anything valuable in your car. There are over 700,000 motor vehicle thefts in the U.S. each year. So to prevent other possessions from getting stolen as well, it’s better not to leave anything behind after you’ve parked your rental car.

General Standards

Every country has its own set of general standards, especially the United States, considering that it’s also composed of 50 different states. If you want to read more about the road rules and standards, you can check out the updated driver’s manual of each state on this page. Following the implemented standards doesn’t only allow smooth travel, but a safe one as well. So be sure to obey the basic driving rules and regulations when visiting the U.S.

Moreover, foreign drivers should decide whether they’ll rent an automatic or manual transmission. In America, automatic cars are more common, so expect these rental cars to be a bit more uncommon and to cost slightly higher than an automatic car. However, when renting a vehicle, remember that it’s also about which car you’re more comfortable with.

If you’re renting an automatic car, driving can be much easier since you won’t be worrying about shifting gears. Also, an automatic car is driver-friendly if you’re staying in cities with heavy traffic or busy roads. On the other hand, if you’re renting a manual car, you have more control over your vehicle due to the number of gears it has. Manual cars are also more fuel-efficient and useful in off-roading activities. Nonetheless, both cars have pros and cons, so in the end, be sure to rent a vehicle that you’re comfortable driving.

Speed Limits

Speed limits are very important, as they help in limiting your vehicle’s speed. Thus, the amount of time it would take for you to react to certain changes on the road would be lessened, and chances of accidents or losing control of your car are reduced. Each U.S. state has its own speed limit, and here are the important speed limits you must remember when you’re driving in the United States.

  • Alabama
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Alaska
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Arizona
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Arkansas
    • Rural interstates – 75 (70 for trucks) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • California
    • Rural interstates – 70 (55 for trucks) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 (55 for trucks) MpH
  • Colorado
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Connecticut
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Delaware
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • District of Columbia – D.C. is not a state; it still has its own rules and acts as a state, except it just has a mayor instead of a governor and is recognized as a district or city-state instead; note that there are also no rural interstates in D.C.
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Florida
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Georgia
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Hawaii
    • Rural interstates – 60 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 60 MpH
  • Idaho
    • Rural interstates – 75 (80 on specified road segments and 70 for trucks) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 75 (80 on specified road segments and 65 for trucks) MpH
  • Illinois
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Indiana
    • Rural interstates – 70 (65 for trucks) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Iowa
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Kansas
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 75 MpH
  • Kentucky
    • Rural interstates – 65 (70 on specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Louisiana
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Maine
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 75 MpH
  • Maryland
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Massachusetts
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Michigan
    • Rural interstates – 70 (65 for trucks); 75 on specified road segments (65 for trucks on specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Minnesota
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Mississippi
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Missouri
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 60 MpH
  • Montana
    • Rural interstates – 80 (70 for trucks) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Nebraska
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Nevada
    • Rural interstates – 80 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • New Hampshire
    • Rural interstates – 65 (70 for specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • New Jersey
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • New Mexico
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 75 MpH
  • New York
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • North Carolina
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • North Dakota
    • Rural interstates – 75 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 75 MpH
  • Ohio
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Oklahoma
    • Rural interstates – 75 (80 on specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Oregon
    • Rural interstates – 65 (55 for trucks); 70 on specified road segments (65 for trucks on specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Pennsylvania
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Rhode Island
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • South Carolina
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • South Dakota
    • Rural interstates – 80 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 80 MpH
  • Tennessee
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Texas
    • Rural interstates – 75 (80 or 85 for specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 75 MpH
  • Utah
    • Rural interstates – 75 (80 on specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 65 MpH
  • Vermont
    • Rural interstates – 65 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Virginia
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Washington
    • Rural interstates – 70 (75 on specified road segments); 60 for trucks MpH
    • Urban interstates – 60 MpH
  • West Virginia
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 55 MpH
  • Wisconsin
    • Rural interstates – 70 MpH
    • Urban interstates – 70 MpH
  • Wyoming
    • Rural interstates – 75 (80 on specified road segments) MpH
    • Urban interstates – 75 (80 on specified road segments) MpH

Seatbelt Laws

Getting into a car accident can be incredibly terrifying, and sometimes injuries are inevitable. However, seat belts have proven to be efficient in these unfortunate circumstances. In 2019, the national usage rate of seat belts reached 90.7%, and around 14,955 lives were saved in 2017. Additionally, seat belts are known to reduce deaths and major injuries caused by vehicular collisions by half.

In the U.S., seat belt use is mandatory in all states except New Hampshire, where passengers below 18 years are required to buckle up. Furthermore, 34 states and the District of Columbia have primary enforcement of seat belt laws. This means police officers can stop and cite motorists for not wearing a seat belt. Meanwhile, in states with secondary enforcement, officers can only enforce the law if the driver has been pulled over for a prior violation.

Lastly, note that seat belt laws are only inclusive of front-seat passengers in some states. And in 29 states along with D.C., this law covers all rear-seat passengers. If you are driving in the U.S., make sure to always buckle up to steer clear of violations and avoid major injuries and possible casualties in car accidents.

Driving Directions

Roundabouts are circular intersections designed to be more efficient and safe than your usual intersection. In the U.S., they are quite common, as the nation is one of the top countries in the world when it comes to circular intersections. Thus, it’s expected that foreign drivers must know how to navigate along these junctions.

In the United States, you will encounter single-lane and multi-lane roundabouts, and here are the rules you must follow when you’ve come across them:

  • Single-lane roundabouts:
    • Slow down and check your left before entering the roundabout
    • Keep your vehicle’s speed low and steady
    • If there’s any traffic, yield to the vehicles within the roundabout
    • Enter the roundabout once you can see a gap in the traffic
    • Before exiting, be sure to signal in case there are pedestrians
    • Although you’re at a single-lane roundabout, don’t forget to always stay in your lane
  • Multi-lane roundabouts:
    • Carefully choose which lane you’ll drive on at the roundabout
      • Choose the left lane if you want to turn left or make a U-turn
      • If you’ll turn right, stay on the right lane
    • Always yield to the vehicles on the roundabout
    • In a multi-lane roundabout, you must yield to both traffic lanes
    • Enter the roundabout once you spot a gap in the traffic
    • Before exiting, signal your intention to turn in case there are pedestrians
    • Always stay in your lane

Lastly, when it comes to overtaking, remember that the maneuver must be performed on the left since the driving side of the country is on the right. Suppose you’re in a hurry or if the vehicle in front of you is going too slow. Remember to overtake cars only when needed since improper passing may result in vehicular accidents.

Traffic Road Signs

Traffic signs are very important as they guide motorists and help maintain the order of the roads. Without these signs, traffic flow would not be regulated, and many road users may violate road rules.

Traffic signs can be seen above or beside roads and highways; nevertheless, there are still people that don’t follow them. If you’re traveling in the U.S., note that obeying driving laws is a must, and officials are not exactly lenient. So if you plan to drive in the country, here are the road signs you’d end up encountering:

A. Regulatory
Regulatory signs are traffic signs that indicate or reinforce certain traffic laws. These signs typically have a white background.

  • Stop
  • Yield
  • Do Not Enter
  • No Left Turn / No Right Turn
  • No Trucks
  • No Parking
  • End Reversible Lane
  • One Way

B. Warning Signs
Warning signs typically conjure a warning message to motorists and have a yellow background.

  • Left Turn Ahead / Right Turn Ahead
  • Left Reverse Turn Head / Right Reverse Turn Ahead
  • Merging Traffic
  • Truck Crossing
  • Hill
  • Signal Ahead
  • Sharp Curve to Right / Sharp Curve to Left
  • Winding Road Left Ahead / Winding Road Right Ahead
  • Cross Road Ahead
  • Y Inters Ahead

C. Guide Signs
Guide signs exhibit permitted traffic movements to motorists and generally have a green background.

  • Interstate Route Marker
  • U.S. Route Marker
  • Hurricane Evacuation Route
  • Park & Ride
  • Roadway Junction
  • Must Exit Lane
  • Destination Distance Sign
  • Mike Marker

D. Service Signs
Service signs indicate services and tourist information for all road users. These signs are usually in blue.

  • Food
  • Lodging
  • Information
  • Handicapped Accessible Facility
  • Gas
  • Telephone
  • Hospitable
  • Rest Area
  • Traveler Information

E. Construction Signs
Construction signs issue warnings and guidance to the drivers in case of road constructions. They usually have an orange background.

  • Road Work Next __ Miles
  • Shoulder Work
  • Flagged Ahead
  • Exit Closed
  • Workers Ahead
  • Detour

F. Recreation Signs
Recreation signs direct motorists to cultural or recreational areas and are usually in brown.

  • Bathrooms
  • Drinking Water
  • Picnic Area
  • Litter Barrel
  • Swimming Area
  • Hiking Trail
  • Winter Recreation
  • Fishing Pier

G. Pedestrian and School Zone
School zone signs indicate school zones and pedestrian crossings and have fluorescent yellow and green backgrounds.

  • School Crosswalk Ahead
  • Share The Road
  • Playground Ahead

H. Incident Management
Incident management signs are generally in coral.

  • Detour
  • Exit Closed
  • Stop Ahead
  • Road Closed Ahead
  • Center Lane Closed Ahead

Right of Way

To be safe and avoid misunderstandings or confrontations on the highway, one of the road rules that motorists must abide by is the right of way. Following the right of way shows how courteous you are as a driver and depicts your road sense. Additionally, the rule states who must yield, as the law does not simply allow anyone the right of way. Here are some of the most important things to remember about the right of way in the U.S.:

  • Always give way to the vehicles in an intersection or the vehicles entering an intersection first
  • If you and another vehicle arrive at an intersection simultaneously, you must yield if the car is on your right
  • You must give way to vehicles at an intersection, given that there is a stop sign
  • At T-intersections, note that cars on the through road have the right of way
  • Always yield to other drivers if there is a yield sign
  • Pedestrians or any person with a disability on a crosswalk has the right of way
  • In multiple lane intersections, if you are on a smaller road, you should give way to vehicles on the larger road
  • If you’re on an access ramp, remember to yield to vehicles on the exit ramp

Before you can drive in any country, you must first ensure that you’re of legal driving age. The United States’ legal driving age varies among states. But most importantly, it also differs from the minimum age requirement of car rental companies which is relatively higher (usually ranging from 21 to 24 years).

When you arrive in the United States, you might be wondering which state has the youngest driving age. This information is very useful if you’re a novice driver or a teenager possibly interested in applying for a U.S. license. Now, if you arrive in the United States as an experienced driver, even the oldest legal driving age won’t be a big deal anymore.

Nonetheless, if you want to drive and eventually obtain a U.S. license, here are the legal driving ages in every state:

  • Alabama
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Alaska
  • Learners permit – 14 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Arizona
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Arkansas
  • Learners permit – 14 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • California
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Colorado
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Connecticut
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years and four months
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Delaware
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • District of Columbia – Again, remember that D.C. is not a state but merely a district or a city-state, but it still has its own rules, including minimum age requirements for its drivers
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Florida
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Georgia
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Hawaii
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Idaho
  • Learners permit – 14.5 years
  • Restricted license – 15 years
  • Full license – 16 years
  • Illinois
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Indiana
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Iowa
  • Learners permit – 14 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Kansas
  • Learners permit – 14 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Kentucky
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Louisiana
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Maine
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Maryland
  • Learners permit – 15 years and nine months
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Massachusetts
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Michigan
  • Learners permit – 14 years and nine months
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Minnesota
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Mississippi
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Missouri
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Montana
  • Learners permit – 14 years and six months
  • Restricted license – 15 years
  • Full license – 16 years
  • Nebraska
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Nevada
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • New Hampshire
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • New Jersey
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 17 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • New Mexico
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 15.5 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • New York
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 17 with classes or 18 years
  • North Carolina
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • North Dakota
  • Learners permit – 14 years
  • Restricted license – 15 years
  • Full license – 16 years
  • Ohio
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Oklahoma
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Oregon
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Pennsylvania
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 17 with classes or 18 years
  • Rhode Island
  • Learners permit – 16 years
  • Restricted license – 16.5 years
  • Full license – 17.5 years
  • South Carolina
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 15.5 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • South Dakota
  • Learners permit – 14 years
  • Restricted license – 14.5 years
  • Full license – 16 years
  • Tennessee
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Texas
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Utah
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Vermont
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Virginia
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years and three months
  • Full license – 18 years
  • Washington
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • West Virginia
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 17 years
  • Wisconsin
  • Learners permit – 15.5 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years
  • Wyoming
  • Learners permit – 15 years
  • Restricted license – 16 years
  • Full license – 16.5 years

Laws on Overtaking

Overtaking, commonly known as “passing” in the U.S., is a maneuver wherein a vehicle drives past another slower vehicle traveling in the same direction on the road. In America, passing is allowed on a road with more than two lanes that are visible and marked clearly. Furthermore, drivers can only overtake on the left side and if there is sight distance on the road.

If you’re unaware of the laws on overtaking in the U.S., here are a few things about passing that you must remember in case you plan to drive in the country:

  • Make sure to overtake vehicles in a legal passing zone
    • Legal passing zones have a dashed yellow centerline that indicates that passing is legal in both directions
  • A solid line paired with a dashed line means that passing is legal for vehicles driving next to the broken line
  • Overtaking is illegal in both directions if there is a solid double yellow line on the road
  • On roads with four or more lanes, traffic is allowed to overtake on either side of a slow-moving vehicle
    • Remember that passing under these circumstances is only allowed if performing the maneuver will not result in any damage or accident

Driving Side

Roughly 65% of the total population drives on the right side of the road. And the U.S. is one of the nations that also operate their vehicles on the right. This also means that the cars in the country are left-hand drive.

If you’re used to driving on the right, then driving in the United States won’t be a problem for you. But if you come from a country that drives on the left, you might need some getting used to. Here some tips for drivers who have never driven on the right side of the road:

  • Practice driving — try getting the feel of staying on the right side, and you can do so just by walking
  • Know the local road rules — familiarize yourself with basic rules like the flow of roundabouts or the proper side to overtake vehicles
  • Stay with the traffic’s flow — this can make switching lanes easier
  • Be alert and stay vigilant — always keep your eyes on the road and have good road sense, be sure that you’re not unconsciously moving to the left side of the road

Driving Etiquettes in the United States

No matter where you are, you might experience some complications on the road, and sometimes, these unfortunate circumstances are unforeseen. Thus, every driver must know the protocols in case they experience events like run-ins with the law or breakdowns. Note that even if you’re confident that these things won’t happen to you, make sure to read this guide in case you do find yourself in any of these scenarios.

Car Breakdown

Will you be driving for a long period? Maybe you have plans of driving from the United States to Canada? Sometimes, that feeling of excitement you experience during your trip can be cut short due to different factors, including car troubles.

Encountering car breakdowns can be very upsetting, especially if you don’t have a backup plan or don’t know the protocols when responding to these situations. That’s why every traveler must be equipped with knowledge when it comes to these matters. Here are some things to remember in case your car breaks down in the U.S.:

  • Pull over to the right side of the road and exit through the passenger’s door that’s away from traffic
  • Turn on your hazard lights, put on your reflective vest, and use reflective triangles to alert oncoming motorists
    • In case you cannot properly park and exit your vehicle, be sure to turn on your hazard lights
  • Contact any of your emergency contacts and ask for help
    • You can call family, police, or roadside assistance and inform them of your predicament

If your vehicle cannot be repaired quickly, be prepared and open to ideas of renting a different car or booking a room for the night, especially if you are experiencing car troubles past sunset. Lastly, if you have any emergency, don’t hesitate to dial 911 as it is the universal emergency hotline throughout the United States.

Police Stops

Police in America can be very intimidating, especially to foreigners. Oftentimes, you can see police cars out and about, waiting to catch disobedient drivers. Do know that police have a specific uniform in each state since the country has highly decentralized law enforcement. Nonetheless, if police will stop you, just make sure they show their badge and some form of identification.

Do you think that cops are tailing you? If so, here are some things to keep in mind to avoid altercations with the law:

  • Turn your lights on and keep your hands where officers can easily see them
    • If possible, keep your hands on the steering wheel and avoid reaching anywhere else since officers may assume you’re reaching for a weapon
  • Ensure that you’re carrying all the important documents, such as your driver’s license, passport, IDP, car registration, and insurance
    • Provide your documents in case police would ask for them
  • Stay calm and be polite — avoid raising your voice, as this can cause misunderstandings and possible arguments

Police mistreating road users isn’t unheard of. So in case you have bad experiences with American authorities, you can present your story in traffic court, given that a citation is issued. A lawyer may also represent you, and if needed, you may face a judge or a magistrate.

Asking Directions

Many ambitious tourists can explore and go driving across the United States in a few days. However, this may require some stops, such as getting some fuel for your car or even for yourself. Suppose you’re ordering food at a drive-through or buying some necessities at the nearest 7-Eleven. Then you’re bound to interact with some locals.

Do know that the United States has no official language, but English is the most spoken among its citizens. So as long as you’re fluent in it, you won’t have any problem conversing with the locals. For travelers that aren’t comfortable interacting with people, you can opt to use maps or GPS devices to get around. However, if you’re going to hotels, malls, restaurants, and other establishments, you’re bound to talk to some staff or personnel.

When talking to locals, remember that you don’t have to be too formal. Be polite as you approach people, but you can speak with them informally, and you don’t even have to shake their hand unless you’re in a formal or business setting. Moreso, you can also greet strangers by exchanging pleasantries out of courtesy instead of attempting to make small talk.

Checkpoints

There are four general types of checkpoints that you might encounter in the U.S., and as a foreigner, it’s important to know what to do if you come across them. Sometimes, presenting the same documents you’d show to traffic enforcers won’t work, especially if you’ve run into crooked cops. Here are some things you need to know about the different checkpoints and what happens under them.

A. DUI Checkpoints

DUI checkpoints, also known as sobriety checkpoints, are the most common roadblocks. And police may take a quick look at the motorists and check their licenses or other valid documents. They will also check the driver’s breath via a breathalyzer to see if they are intoxicated.

Note that drinking and driving are rampant in the United States; this is why many DUI checkpoints are scattered throughout the country. However, even with the presence of DUI laws, there are still many violators. In 2019, there were a recorded 10,142 drunk-driving deaths, alone, in the United States. Thus, stricter DUI laws are needed and are slowly being implemented in the nation.

B. Border Checkpoints

Under border checkpoints, be aware that Customs and Border Protection (CBD) agents (who are part of the Department of Homeland Security) are allowed to search your belongings any time, so you must always consent to a search. If you are suspected of carrying illegal items, note that they might perform a pat-down, strip, x-ray, and body cavity searches.

Recently, DHS agents have set up checkpoints near borders, typically up to 100 miles within the U.S. territory. If you encounter these checkpoints, remember that you can refuse a search or choose not to answer any question thrown at you.

C. Drug Checkpoints

Unlike checkpoints situated near borders, drug checkpoints are deemed to be unconstitutional. So if you come across these roadblocks, know that many police have found a way to exploit them. Their usual tactic is to wait for drivers to pass the checkpoint. However, they will not stop the motorists and only pull over the vehicles if they have done “illegal turns” or other maneuvers.

Before encountering these checkpoints, there’s usually signage indicating a “Drug Checkpoint Ahead.” If you drive past one, make sure that you don’t pull over rest areas, as drug-sniffing dogs are typically present. Bear in mind that if there are any illegal arrests made, you can contact a lawyer. Furthermore, you may contact the state’s ACLU Chapter to report these checkpoints that typically occur in the Midwest.

D. TSA Checkpoints

Aside from border checkpoints, Transportation Security Agency (TSA) agents are also allowed to inspect your belongings whenever you encounter TSA airport security zones. But once again, if you feel like you are subjected to unconstitutional practices, don’t hesitate to file a report against them.

Other Tips

One of the worst scenarios you can encounter when driving abroad is car accidents. That’s why it’s a must to know what to do if they ever happen. For foreign drivers who still want their trip to be as stress-free as possible, be sure to follow these steps in case you get involved in a vehicular accident in the United States.

What if I Get Involved in an Accident?

One of the most dreaded situations any driver would find themself in is a car accident. There can be multiple reasons for this, including brake failure, icy roads, improper overtaking, speeding, and many more. Even so, motorists must always know what to do if they are thrust into these circumstances.

If you get involved in a vehicular accident in the U.S., make sure to follow these steps to avoid further complications of the scenario you’re in:

  • If possible, park your car and alert other motorists by flashing your hazard lights
  • Stay at the scene to avoid legal consequences and additional violations — if you leave, you might get fined or even jailed
  • Contact authorities immediately — you can call 911 or directly call the police so someone can attend to the scene right away
    • Once cops have arrived, they will make an accident report
  • Stay calm and don’t pick a fight with the other party. Instead, exchange contact details and insurance information
    • If there are witnesses, make sure to get their contact information as well
  • Call your insurance provider and inform them of what happened so you can complete any necessary paperwork and have your car fixed

Do know that certain accident factors, like drinking and driving, are very serious in the United States. And if authorities find out you’ve caused the accident due to being intoxicated, you may face serious charges, and your trip will be cut short. Remember that the percentage of drunk-driving accidents in the United States is quite high, and aside from wanting a stress-free road trip, you also definitely wouldn't want to be part of that statistic.

Driving Conditions in the United States

Knowing the country’s driving conditions is one of the best ways to prepare yourself for your trip. This is because you already have an idea of what to expect while navigating the country’s roads. America’s driving conditions vary in every state, but if you still want a rough idea of what it’ll be like to explore the country by car, don’t hesitate to continue reading this guide.

Accident Statistics

According to the 2019 data from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System or FARS, there were a total of 36,096 deaths due to car crashes in the United States. Many of these cases are caused by alcohol and drugs, phone usage, speeding, drowsiness, and even the lack of attention to the road.

Another statistic to be aware of is the number of underage drinking and driving accidents in the United States, which contribute to roughly 17% of the total drunk-driving accidents in the country. Although slowly dwindling, teens who drink and drive are a serious issue. And if you’re a teenager who plans to visit and drive in the U.S., note that you may face serious charges if you’ve caused accidents due to drunk-driving.

All these factors are caused by man, and as foreign drivers, it is your responsibility to obey the road rules of the country you’re visiting. Not only does this depict you as a courteous visitor, but it also shows that you want to preserve the peace and order of the roads. Finally, to prevent yourself from getting into accidents or similar situations, always remember to follow the road rules and have good road sense for a smooth trip in the U.S.

Common Vehicles

There is a huge number of motorists driving in the United States. And in 2019, roughly 276 million vehicles were registered. Suppose you want to take a break from the usual vehicles on the streets like cars, motorcycles, or even bicycles. In that case, you can try out the different modes of public transportation, which will also be a whole new experience in the country.

American society greatly benefits from public transport, as it connects people and allows them to visit places from afar. They also decongest traffic and promote a greener environment. The different kinds of public transport you may see or ride in the U.S. include the following:

  • Buses
  • Subways
  • Light rail
  • Commuter trains
  • Cable cars
  • Vanpool services
  • Monorails and tramways
  • Streetcars and trolleys
  • Paratransit services (mainly for the elderly and people with disabilities)

Toll Roads

Driving across the U.S. means you’re bound to encounter toll roads. Some highways and bridges will require drivers to pay a fee. However, not all states have tolls, so you don’t have to worry if you’re traveling along the roads of Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Wisconsin, and Tennessee. Meanwhile, states like California, New York, Texas, Florida, Georgia, Virginia, and New Jersey have toll roads, so be prepared when driving in these areas.

Note that toll fees differ according to location, vehicle type, as well as the pass you choose for the payment. Each state also has various ways to pay for tolls, and the most commonly used method is the E-ZPass.

Do know that if you cannot register your license plate or pay online, the car rental company will be billed in place. To avoid this, be sure to speak with them and inquire about all the possible details to pay the tolls.

Road Situations

The United States has roughly 4.18 million miles of public roads, and around 76% are paved. These roads are classified into a functional system according to the service they provide. The interstate system is the highest classification of arterial roads and makes up the designated freeway routes.

Other arterial systems consist of limited-access freeways, multi-lane highways, and other significant highways that supplement the interstate system. Additionally, there are the collectors which are minor and major roads connecting the local roads with arterial. And lastly, the local roads, which provide limited mobility and are used by motorists who have access to them.

It’s notable that, although the U.S. road system is complex and generally in good condition, many roads are beginning to deteriorate due to the ever-growing number of vehicles. More potholes are forming, and the paved roads are starting to crack. Nonetheless, this shouldn’t put you off from seeing the beauty of the United States, as road tripping is one of the best ways to explore the country.

Driving Culture

Every country has its reputation when it comes to its drivers, and the U.S. is no different. Drivers vary across the nation; some can be hostile, while others are polite and respectful. However, in general, Americans are considered to be good drivers.

Many locals follow road rules and are considerate to all road users. They usually give way and are typically relaxed on the highways. This can be attributed to the laws of the road, and the penalties that may befall the drivers that violate them. Still, reckless and irresponsible drivers are unavoidable, so make sure to remain alert and cautious no matter where you’re driving.

Other Tips

There are a few things that tourists must be aware of if they plan to drive in the States. And although not as significant as others, they can still be quite relevant. So here are some tips you might find helpful if you plan to go on a road trip in the country.

Are They Using KpH or MpH?

Unlike most of the world, the U.S. uses the imperial system of units. Thus, you will see MpH as a unit of speed in most vehicles’ speedometers. However, some cars in the country are marked with much smaller numerals labeled with KpH. Nevertheless, note that although these cars also use KpH, MpH is still primarily used in America.

Suppose you have a car with both MpH and KpH etched on the speedometer. Do know that vehicles like these can come in handy, especially if you’ll be driving from the United States to neighboring countries like Canada or Mexico since these nations use KpH as well. But if you’re just staying in the U.S., you don’t have to worry too much about the usage of MpH, as there will be speed limit signs to guide you.

Is It Safe to Drive During the Winter?

For foreigners, particularly those living in hot and humid countries, the idea of snow can be new and exciting, especially if you’ve never experienced it before. However, if the conditions are extreme, snow and winter driving, per se, can be dangerous. So if you’re driving in the U.S. during the winter, here are some tips to ensure a safe trip:

  • Store some blankets, a flashlight, food, water, warm clothing, and other useful emergency items in your vehicle
  • Make sure your tires are in good condition — that is, they must be inflated and have plenty of treads
  • Keep some fuel (at least half a tank) in your car
  • Refrain from warming up your vehicle in enclosed areas
  • Cruise controls should be avoided when driving on icy roads
  • Always drive, accelerate, and decelerate slowly
  • Increase the following distance between your car and the vehicle ahead of you by five to six seconds — this will give you ample time if you want to stop the car
  • Be familiar with your brakes and make sure it is working

Lastly, before you set off on your trip, don’t forget to always check the weather forecast. If there’s any bad weather predicted, cancel your plans right away, as your safety comes first. If the weather is fine and you may go on with your day, don’t forget to notify your friends, family, or even hotel staff of your plans, especially if you’ll be traveling long-distance.

Things To Do in the United States

There is never a dull moment in the U.S., especially since the country is very diverse geographically and culturally. Suppose you find yourself becoming more than just a tourist. This section will give you an insight into the different things you might need to acquire; from driver’s licenses to green cards. So if relocating to the U.S. is part of your plan, make sure to take your time as you read through this guide.

Drive as a Tourist

As a tourist, it is your responsibility to follow the driving laws of the country you’re visiting. By complying with the road rules and requirements, not only are you obeying the law, but you’re also steering clear of any accidents or mishaps on the road.

If you’re an avid phone user, you should be familiar with some of the texting and driving laws in the United States. It’s known to avoid using distracting items while you’re on the road. So if possible, lay off the phones and gadgets in the meantime. Additionally, if you’ll be road-tripping from one state to another, you should be aware of some of the drowsy driving laws in the United States. Of course, these are just a few of the laws you need to know.

Additionally, you should also be aware of certain things like the history of drunk-driving in the United States and how many people have suffered from driving inebriated. It’s very important to be responsible for yourself and the other road users. Lastly, before you go driving in the United States, make sure to always carry your driver’s license, IDP, passport, car registration, and insurance for a smooth journey.

Work as a Driver

If you want to reside in the U.S. and think you’re familiar with the highways and routes in your area, you can opt to work as a driver. There are many vacant driver positions, and you can work as a personal driver, a delivery driver, or even a truck driver in the country. Do note that there are more driving jobs aside from those mentioned, and you can always check what’s available in your state.

Furthermore, there are certain types of licenses to obtain if you’ll be working as a driver. For certain occupations like truck driving, you will also need to enroll in truck driving schools in the United States. Driving schools in the country aren’t particularly cheap, but for truck driving schools and other premier institutions, you’ll have to shell out a lot of money.

Now, suppose you don’t want to work as a taxi driver, but you’re still interested in driving people around. If you want a job that can cater to your convenience, maybe Uber is for you. You can visit this page to check out the requirements to become an Uber driver in America.

Work as a Travel Guide

Are you proficient in American history and culture? Do you think you have what it takes to be a tour guide in the country? If so, then don’t hesitate to apply for the position. In the U.S., travel guides usually earn around $50 to $150 per day in base pay, and this is still subject to change since tourist guides may receive tips.

If you’re interested in becoming a travel guide in the U.S., some of the requirements needed include:

  • High school diploma or an equivalent certificate (having a college degree may be required or would give you an edge when applying for certain positions, such as museum guides)
  • Previous tour guide experience
  • Skillset
    • This includes interpersonal communication, flexibility, sense of humor, and other skills required in the job you applied for
  • Professional license
    • In some cities, you would first need a license before you can operate as a guide. These cities are:
      • Washington, D.C.
      • New York, NY
      • Savannah, GA
      • Charleston, SC
      • Gettysburg Battlefield, PA
      • Vicksburg Battlefield, MI
      • New Orleans, LA

Apply for Residency

The United States is a hodgepodge of cultures and traditions, and although visiting the country may be jarring at first, many would easily fit in and get used to the place. If you’re looking for work opportunities or have fallen in love with the charm of the country, you may decide to relocate to the U.S. However, you’d first need to apply for residency, and for those that are planning to live in the country long-term, you will need to obtain a green card.

Besides the supporting documents to your application form, you must first comply with many requirements before officially getting a green card. And one of these requirements states that applicants must have lived in the United States for three to five years. Additionally, there are also different categories for your Green Card eligibility. If you want to know more about the application process, you can visit this page.

Other Things to Do

Relocating overseas isn’t easy since this means uprooting your life and starting anew. However, if you do have plans to reside in the U.S, here are some things you might find helpful, especially if you’ll be a resident of the country.

How Do I Apply for an American Driver’s License?

Once you’ve arrived, you’ll see how great the numbers of motorists driving in the United States are. And if you’ll be residing in the country, you have the option to commute or drive your own vehicle.

If you’re unable to commute, driving is the most efficient way to get around. And if you’re interested in obtaining a driver’s license, you’ll first need to submit certain documents. However, these requirements may differ among various states, but the general processes remain the same. If you’re dead set on obtaining a driver’s license, here are the steps you’d need to complete to acquire one in America:

1. Compile your documents

Some documents you’ll need include the following:

  • Passport or any valid ID
  • Social security number
  • Proof of lawful presence (visa, Green Card, citizenship certification)
  • Proof of residence
  • International drivers permit
  • Application form

Note that these are the standards documents needed in each state. And to be eligible for a driver’s license, you will also need to be of legal driving age, which also varies across the country.

2. Pay the fees

Depending on how extensive your driver’s education is and on the type of driving school you’ve enrolled in, the fees you’ll have to pay may be as low as $20 to as high as $1,000.

If you’re applying for a license for work purposes (ex. truck driving), you’ll also have to enroll in appropriate driving institutions, such as truck driving schools, in the United States.

3. Take the exams

Applicants must take a written and practical exam. For written exams, tests will have around 20 to 50 questions regarding the state’s traffic rules. If you want to study in advance, you can visit this page to read about the driver’s handbook of your state.

After passing the written test, you will schedule a practical driving exam where your parking, reversing, and other driving skills will be tested. The exam typically lasts for 30 to 40 minutes, and in case you fail it, you may have to wait for a few days or a week before you can try again. However, additional fees may apply, and depending on the state, you might have to reapply again.

4. Have your vision tested

Medical exams aren’t required when applying for a driver’s license. However, you will need to take an eye test. If you cannot get your vision tested by a medical professional, you can opt to have it done at your local DMV office.

5. Get your license

After fulfilling all the requirements and completing all the steps, you will receive a temporary license which you can use within 30 to 90 days, depending on your state. After that, your license will be mailed to you, and you can finally drive around.

What Are the Work Opportunities in the US?

America is known as the land of opportunity, and many people constantly look for jobs in the country. However, sealing the deal is never easy, as the competition is very high. You’d have to find a willing employer, and if you do find one, it’s not secured that the position you’ll get is your dream job.

Nevertheless, do know that there are many career fields you can look into that are well-paying and have a constantly growing employment rate. Some of these industries include:

  • Health care
  • Education
  • Information technology
  • Business
  • Finance
  • Architecture and engineering
  • Advertising, marketing, and promotions
  • Mathematics
  • Social services

Top Destinations in the United States

The United States has so many different landmarks and attractions that cater to all people. From museums and theme parks to monuments and natural wonders, tourists will never grow bored of the endless sights to see and things to do in the country. And although there are too many to choose from, here are some of the top destinations you could visit in the U.S.

Hollywood

No matter what decade you’re in, there will always be people drawn to the glitz and glamor of Hollywood stars. Even if the rich and famous life doesn't interest you, there will still be that lingering curiosity about what the world of a movie star is like.

In the U.S., there's no better place to experience the rich film and entertainment history and heritage like Hollywood in Los Angeles, California. With all the museums, clubs, bars, and other iconic attractions, tourists will surely have the time of their lives in one of L.A.’s most iconic areas.

Driving Directions:

  1. From Los Angeles International Airport, head west on W Century Blvd toward Vicksburg Ave.
  2. Use the right two lanes to turn right onto S Sepulveda Blvd and keep right.
  3. Turn right onto Howard Hughes Pkwy.
  4. Use the right two lanes to take the ramp onto I-405 N.
  5. Merge onto I-405 N.
  6. Take exit 53B to merge onto I-10 E toward Los Angeles and keep left.
  7. Take exit 8 for La Brea Ave.
  8. Keep left at the fork, follow signs for La Brea Ave N and merge onto South La Brea Ave.
  9. Merge onto South La Brea Ave.
  10. Turn right onto Edgewood Pl and continue onto S Highland Ave.
  11. Make a slight left to stay on S Highland Ave.
  12. Turn right onto Melrose Ave.
  13. Turn left onto Cahuenga Blvd.

Things to Do
Hollywood is one of the most popular spots to visit in Los Angeles, especially since it’s the epicenter and origin of America’s film industry. While you’re waiting to catch a glimpse of your favorite celebrity, here are some activities that you can enjoy in Hollywood.

  1. See the Hollywood Sign
    Probably the most iconic site in Hollywood, make sure to see and take some photos of the popular hillside Hollywood sign built in the 1920s to advertise Hollywoodland initially. In 1978, the sign was changed into “Hollywood” and is now one of the most famous attractions in the city.
  2. Visit the Walk of Fame
    If you want to see some of the most famous names in Hollywood, take a stroll along the Walk of Fame located at Hollywood Boulevard. The names of the different actors, directors, musicians, TV personalities and other big people are honored in a bronze-rimmed star cemented on the sidewalk. As of now, there are roughly 2,500 stars, so if you’re wondering whether your favorite artist’s name is there, be sure to check out the Walk of Fame.
  3. Go to Universal Studios Hollywood
    Another one of Hollywood’s most popular attractions is Universal Studios Hollywood. The site is divided into a theme park, a working studio, a Universal City Walk, and an area for different restaurants and shops. Universal Studios Hollywood welcomes guests of all ages, so whether you’re with kids or with an older crowd, you’ll surely still have fun.
  4. Drop By the Hollywood Museum
    There are many museums and other attractions in Hollywood. However, if you want to learn more about Hollywood’s history and golden age, you can check out the Hollywood Museum. The building has four floors of exhibits, and guests can look around to see the different costumes, props, items, and even sets that played big roles in Hollywood movies.
  5. Go Sightseeing at Sunset Strip
    If you want to sightsee, shop, or eat in different restaurants, you can visit Sunset Strip. It’s part of Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood, filled with various establishments that people flock to. At night, the streets are filled with neon signs, and for people who want a taste of the bustling city life, this spot would be the perfect place to have a walk-in. If you’re lucky, you might even get to bump into some celebrities hanging around the area.

Las Vegas Strip

One of the most fun and exciting cities to visit in the United States is Las Vegas. The Las Vegas Strip, in particular, is lined with numerous resorts, hotels, restaurants, and other entertainment establishments. The bright lights that illuminate the city at night draw crowds in and have also given the place its popular image to people from all over the world. So if you’re visiting the U.S., don’t hesitate to drop by the Las Vegas Strip to see the sights and soak in the warm lights of quintessential Las Vegas.

Driving Directions:

  1. From McCarran International Airport, head south on McCarran Airport Connector/Paradise Rd toward Wayne Newton Blvd.
  2. Take the left lane to stay on McCarran Airport Connector/Paradise Rd.
  3. Turn left onto Kitty Hawk Way.
  4. Make a slight left onto McCarran Airport Connector/S University Center Dr/Wayne Newton Blvd.
  5. Take the middle lane to turn left onto E Harmon Ave.
  6. Take the right two lanes to turn right onto Paradise Rd.
  7. Take the left two lanes to turn left onto E Flamingo Rd.

Things to Do
Las Vegas is greatly known for its nightlife and casinos. However, there are other fun things that tourists can do, particularly at the Las Vegas Strip. Whether you’re traveling with adults or with children, here are some activities that you enjoy besides gambling and exploring the city at night.

  1. Watch Cirque du Soleil
    Cirque du Soleil is known to have five different shows, some of the best in Las Vegas. Each show is known for its world-class production, from jaw-dropping stunts and choreography to its top-notch technology. Have the time of your life, alone or with your loved ones, and take your pick among the five productions.
  2. See the Fountains of Bellagio
    Visitors of all ages will surely have fun watching the water show at the Fountains of Bellagio. Guests can enjoy the choreographed routines of the water spouting out of the 8-acre lake as it moves in sync with the music. If you’re traveling with children, make sure to stop by this popular spot since it’s also one of the more kid-friendly areas in Las Vegas.
  3. Shop at the World’s Largest Gift Shop
    Suppose you want to go shopping, or maybe you want to look for some souvenirs for your friends. Visit and shop at the Bonanza Gift Shop, also known as the World's Largest Gift Shop. You can find different items and trinkets at the mall that spans over 40,000 sq. ft. The friendly staff will help you around, so you definitely won’t have a hard time navigating the area.
  4. Visit the Adventuredome Theme Park
    If you want to have some fun at a theme park without worrying about the weather, be sure to drop by Adventuredome. It’s one of the largest indoor theme parks in America, with around 25 rides and attractions that friends and families can enjoy. So whether it be riding a roller coaster or playing laser tag, don’t hesitate to visit Adventuredome to have some indoor fun.
  5. Gamble at one of the Casinos
    Of course, for the older crowd, your trip to Vegas would be incomplete if you don’t explore some of the casinos and gamble at the Strip. From slot machines to poker tables, guests have various casino games to choose from. So don’t forget to hit the casinos before you leave the city if you want a story to tell when you get back home. Here are some of the notable casinos to visit during your trip to the Strip:
    • Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino
    • Bellagio Hotel and Casino
    • MGM Grand
    • ARIA Resort & Casino
    • The Venetian Las Vegas
    • Caesars Palace
    • Circus Circus Las Vegas

New York City

New York City is an iconic and extremely popular city in the U.S. It is also called “The Big Apple” after John J. Fitz Gerald popularized it in the roaring ‘20s. New York offers tourists endless activities to do and numerous attractions to visit.

From the stunning views atop the Empire State Building to the different breathtaking Broadway performances, visitors will definitely never grow tired of the city that never sleeps. If you want to do something night and day, visiting New York will be one of the best things you can do when traveling in the U.S.

Driving Directions:

  1. From LaGuardia Airport, head west toward 94th St.
  2. Merge onto Grand Central Pkwy.
  3. Take exit 4 toward Brooklyn Queens Expy E and continue on the expressway.
  4. Continue driving onto I-278 W/Brooklyn Queens Expy E and be sure to stay on I-278 W.
  5. Take exit 29 to merge onto Tillary St.
  6. Turn right onto Brooklyn Bridge.
  7. Take the 2nd from the left lane to take the Park Row exit.
  8. Keep right at the fork, follow signs for NY-9A/West Side Hwy/Church St.
  9. Continue onto Park Row.
  10. Turn right onto Steve Flanders Square.

Things to Do
New York is surely one of the busiest cities in the world, and depending on the time of the year, tourists have the opportunity to experience some of the city’s craziest events. But whether you’re visiting during spring or autumn, here are some of the top attractions and activities you should never miss during your stay in the Big Apple.

  1. Watch a Broadway Show
    Watching a Broadway show is definitely one of the top things to do in New York City, especially since some of the oldest and best shows are still running. And if you’re a theater geek, Broadway should definitely be part of your bucket list, as it’s known to be the Pinnacle of American theater. There are multiple theater venues in the Theater District, and if you want to watch a show, make sure to book in advance.
  2. Climb the Empire State Tower
    One of New York’s most famous spots, the Empire State stands 381 meters tall and houses 102 stories. Tourists can climb up the two observatories to see the stunning view of the city. You can even see parts of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and even Pennsylvania on good days. If you want to visit the highest open-air observation deck, make sure to drop by the 86th floor. Meanwhile, the top deck located on the 102nd floor may be much higher, but the viewing area is enclosed.
  3. Take a Walk at Central Park
    There are many iconic spots in New York City that you have most probably seen on movies and TV shows, and one of them is Central Park. Central Park is the place to be if you want to go for a walk, a jog, or even a carriage ride. During winter, you can even go ice skating at the Wollman Rink. So if you want a little bit of nature from the crazy city life of New York, don’t forget to drop by Central Park.
  4. Book a Cruise to Liberty Island
    Another popular American landmark is the Statue of Liberty in New York. You can see the statue from Battery Park alone. Still, if you want to experience the iconic structure up close, you can take a boat trip to Liberty Island to fully appreciate the beauty of the Statue of Liberty. Guests can roam around the base, and if they’ve booked in advance, they can even go up the crown.
  5. Tour Around the Metropolitan Museum of Art
    New York is home to many famous museums, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art is one of them. Founded in 1870, it now has over two million art pieces created within the past 5,000 years. Among the three sites, the highlight is The Met Fifth Avenue which houses American art, armor, costumes, Egyptian art, musical instruments, and other unique pieces.

The Grand Canyon

Easily one of America’s most popular tourist attractions, the Grand Canyon located in Arizona measures 277 miles long and 18 miles wide. The multilayered bands that make up the canyon reveal much of the site’s geologic history, and travelers can admire the gorgeous scenery by perching on the top of its cliffs.

The Grand Canyon has a North Rim and a South Rim, with the latter being the most visited by its guests, as it is also open all year round and caters to everyone. So if you want to go on a hike and see one of the most spectacular views in America, the Grand Canyon is surely the place to be.

Driving Directions:

  • If you’re driving to the South Rim, this page has some of the best routes you could take. Different driving directions will each depend on your starting point.
  • On the other hand, this page will give you some of the best routes to take if you’re traveling to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. Again, there are varying directions, and you can choose to follow which one suits you best.

Things to Do
There are many natural wonders in the U.S.A, and if you’re a nature lover, you’ll surely enjoy the Grand Canyon. So if this popular site is part of your trip, here are some things you can do to make your visit worthwhile.

  1. Walk the Trail of Time
    If you want to spend some time under the sun without going out of breath, you can walk along the Trail of Time in the South Rim. The path is flat and measures 2.83 miles so that visitors won’t tire out easily. For Earth Science or even history lovers, this is the perfect attraction to visit if you want to learn more about the canyon’s geologic history.
  2. Take Photos of the Stunning Landscape
    The Grand Canyon is one of the most beautiful places on earth, so you mustn’t leave the site without snapping some photos. Guests can see the Colorado River below and admire the beauty of the canyon walls as they’re hit by the sun. If you wish to do so, you can even watch the sunrise and sunset for a magical experience.
  3. Join a Guided Bicycle Tour
    Another activity you can enjoy at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon is cycling. Riding a bike is a great way to explore the area and go sightseeing. If you don’t have your own bike, you can rent one, then hit the trails. In case you’re feeling tired, you can grab some food at Bright Angels Bicycles, as they operate a coffee bar/café that caters to cyclists and pedestrians in the area.
  4. Ride a Mule
    Do you want to explore the Grand Canyon without going on foot? You can opt to ride a mule at the South Rim for a slightly different experience. Suppose you can only spare a few hours on the site. You can take the Canyon Vistas Ride, wherein you’ll be touring around the South Rim. However, if you’re willing to spend the night at the Grand Canyon, you can opt for the Overnight Ride, wherein you’ll be going to the bottom of the canyon and staying at Phantom Ranch.
  5. Go Smooth Water Rafting on the Colorado River
    For those who still want an outdoorsy activity without traveling by foot, you can ride a raft on the Colorado River at the bottom of the canyons. Guests can choose between a half-day or an all-day trip from Glen Canyon Dam to Lees Ferry. There are commercial and non-commercial trips in the river, and if you want to know more about them, you can visit this site.

Walt Disney World Resort

There’s no other place like the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida for kids and kids-at-heart. A lot of people have grown up with Disney, so visiting Disney World will surely bring a rush of nostalgia. The park measures roughly 40 sq. miles and is home to four theme parks, two water adventure parks, numerous resort hotels, and other entertainment areas. For guests who want to do endless activities with a magical experience, make sure to visit the Walt Disney World Resort when you’re traveling in the United States.

Driving Directions:

  • If you plan to drive to Disney World Resort, this site will redirect you to one of Disney World’s FAQs pages. It displays the best driving routes you can take if you’re staying in some of the major cities in the U.S. or Canada.

Things to Do
The Disney World Resort in Orlando is the world’s largest Disney Park since it houses many attractions, and the activities people can enjoy are endless. Thus, it’s very difficult to cover the area for a day. However, no matter how long your trip is, these are a few things both kids and adults can enjoy when visiting Disney World.

  1. Explore the Theme Parks
    Another thing to do before you leave is to buy some souvenirs from the numerous shops and stalls scattered throughout Disney World. Although taking some pictures is enough for some, if you’re willing to splurge (even just a bit!) don’t hesitate to grab some trinkets or even a stuffed toy that will remind you of your trip to the Disney World Resort.
  2. Check-in at one of the Hotels
    Spending one day at Disney World isn’t enough. So if you’re planning to have a magical week, you can check-in at one of the resort hotels at the park. If you don't have any idea of the accommodations on-site, visit this page to see a list of all the different resort hotels in Disney World.
  3. Walk Along Disney’s BoardWalk
    Disney World’s Boardwalk is the perfect place to stroll if you want to experience the park’s nightlife. With the twinkling night lights and their reflection on Crescent Lake, the whole scene would seem as if it’s taken right out of a Disney movie. By walking along the area, you also get to see some of the best restaurants to dine in and the unique shops that might entice you to purchase some Disney merchandise.

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